Dun Dealy – “God’s Call” [Official Music Video]

By: Shamus Hill

Dorchester native Dun Dealy taps in Gil Videos to help bring the official music video for his new single “God’s Call” into existence.

Arguably the biggest standout within his musical catalog to date, “God’s Call” is a three minute offering during which Dun Dealy details some of what he’s endured in life. No matter the set of circumstances, he continues to persevere through any and all obstacles that lay in his path. This perseverance is something that’s continuously been a theme within Dun Dealy’s releases, as the Dorchester rapper manages to paint powerful anecdotes of Boston’s street life in each and every verse.

Watch the official music video for “God’s Call” below:

Ronny Llama – ‘Give It A Year’

By: Eden Bekele

Making his Graduation Music debut is rapper/producer, Ronny Llama, who recently graced listeners with his first official project, Give It a Year. The project was Llamas second release of 2018, following his first single titled, “Hueman”. 

The Dorchester native is no stranger to the Boston scene, and his project even starts with a promise to put on for the city. Give It a Year sits at 9 tracks — with each being full of pure introspection, lyricism and a proper amount of humor. Llama mixes his lyrical prowess with nostalgic and eery beats throughout, which assist in making even the most emotionless listener feel deeply. From “Ñac Ñac”, where his production and humming is reminiscent of a young Kid Cudi, to “Days I Think of You”, where a heartbroken lover leaves a chilling voicemail — Llama captivates listeners and leaves us wanting more. 

In the two months following the release of the project, Llama has dropped three singles, “What I Do”, “Passive Aggressive”, and “Goodbye”, which collectively make it known that this isn’t the artist to sleep on. His 2019 has been incredibly bright up through this point in time, and we look forward to hearing more from Ronny Llama as he continues his journey towards success. 

Listen to Ronny Llama’s debut album ‘Give It A Year’ below:

CLICK HERE TO STREAM VIA SPOTIFY

Valley – “Time” [Official Music Video]

By: Shamus Hill

Dorchester’s finest, Valley, graces the Graduation Music site once again with an elegant visual for his brand-new single “Time”.

Throughout the last couple of years, Valley has been able to nestle himself towards the top of the food chain with respect to the music coming out of Massachusetts. His discography is one that is finely-calibrated, with each individual component being of utmost perfection. Following the success of his handful of singles, Valley sought out M9visuals to bring his first music video to life — with everyone involved truly hitting this one out of the park.

Centering itself around life in “Lil Miami”, this release fully embodies the glamorizing presence that surrounds Valley within both his discography and everyday life. He possesses an innate ability to flow meticulously whilst giving listeners a glimpse at his lifestyle — one that straight-up exudes authenticity. Lacing him with some entrancing production once again is Stoop Kid, who’s wondrous ability to craft an instrumental has really taken Valley’s music to an entirely new caliber of success. Relying solely off of the potency present within his music rather than some form of a gimmick, there isn’t a single doubt surrounding the fact that the Dorchester native will quickly become a household name within the Hip-Hop community.

Watch the official music video for “Time” below:

Directed by M9Visuals

Produced by Stoop Kid

CLICK HERE TO STREAM VIA SPOTIFY

CLICK HERE TO STREAM VIA APPLE MUSIC

An Interview with CHI

By: Eden Bekele

While authenticity in an industry that is seemingly over saturated with disingenuous players is a novelty these days, no one stands more true to themselves in the Boston scene, as CHI. She is an artist, DJ and creative from the city who is a great example of how realness will only elevate your work and spirit.

It has been half a year since CHI dropped her LP titled B.O.M.B. short for “Back On My Bullsh*t”, and listeners have been fiending for more content since. The project was a successful 11 tracks, filled with an all-star roster of Boston artists, all contributing to the power that is B.O.M.B. Prior to releasing her LP, CHI had collaborated with Gin Mason and SuperSmashBroz, to release their joint project Code Name: Girls Next Door,  which included the catchy Girls Night single, as well as releasing her own series of singles and DJ mixes.

We had the privilege to sit down and speak candidly with CHI on being a veteran in the Boston scene, her creative influences, and what the future holds.


Where are you from?

I’m from Dorchester by ways of Nigeria. If I wanna be real specific I’m a young Igbo person- woman.

So you’re Nigerian, and you’re Igbo, how does that influence you?

That’s like my whole origin right there. I’m big on origins, I’m big on my roots. I grew up in a household that was very African, like very African. Something my dad used to say when I was growing up, he would be like: “When you come into my house, you’re not in America anymore, you’re in Owerri. So treat it like that.” My dad used to say that to me all the time, so that’s how I grew up.

Who or what are your biggest musical influences?

Sh*t, I was talking to somebody about this the other day. I have a lot of influences, because I listen to a lot of music and I grew up in a very musical house. Off the rip- singing wise, I get a lot of my influences from falceto males, like D’Angelo, Maxwell, Prince, that’s where I learned how to riff, Rudy Currence, sh*t like that. Obviously Lauryn Hill is a big influence on me. I don’t like to say her immediately though, because i feel like people assume that’s my main influence and its actually not. People always givin’ me the Lauryn and the Tracy Chapman, another one of my influences is Brandy, notice how I haven’t named any rappers. Before, KRS was one of my main rappers, but before I was really into rap I was into RnB, I was into Jazz. I was into a lot of African music growing up. Dancehall. I wasn’t really into rap music until I rediscovered 90s rap on my own, when I was about 11/12. I was kinda like ‘yeah i like rap music’.

Going back to Lauryn Hill, she talks a lot about the Israelites how do you see yourself fitting into that narrative because I know you have a song (titled Israelite: God Bless Amerikkka) about it as well?

I know that that’s my truth and that’s my history, even though growing up as black people we don’t learn too much about our true history. I think for me I fit into that because it’s like a coming of age- more like a going back home.

People think life is about turning into a new person, but it’s really about turning into your actual self. So when I think about being an israelite and being part of like a lost group of people, I see myself fitting into that- I see all of us fit into that though. I think the difference is some people own it and some people don’t.

So getting into the music, Boston and your home, how do you feel like the scene has changed since you’ve been coming up?

You know what’s funny about that? I grew up in Boston, like actually, actually. We are in my neighborhood where I went to school. I feel like automatically, off the rip, I have a whole different view of the scene than everyone else does. Because before the scene, there was the young ethnic community in Boston. I wasn’t really one of those kids going downtown and doing all the crazy stuff, but I was family friends with people who were doing that- or like I had history with people who were doing that. And you know I was never really like that going downtown to go jerk and stuff, I wasn’t like that, but those people are pioneers of the scene.

A lot of people came up like that. So when I think about the scene I don’t really think of it- like not to say there isn’t a scene, because there is, but my place in the scene is a little different because I have real roots in the scene.

So having said that last part do you feel people are just entering the scene to fit in?

Absolutely, I think some people see it as a way to get internet famous. And Im like n*gga whats your talent though? What are you doing to progress the scene? Confuses me.

So I see that you have a lot of relationships like you said and I’ve noticed you have some hits with SuperSmashBroz and Gin Mason, what are those relationships like and how was putting together ‘Girls Night’?

Everybody loves that song. That song is great. It’s just what I was just saying, those are my friends. I been friends with Gin before music and the reason why those songs came out was because it was really authentic. We friends, we vibe, we understand that we wanted to make a certain thing so we executed it.

That’s just the homies getting together, but a lot of my music is like. If were homies and you want to make music, or if we click on a level outside of music, it just makes me want to collab even more.

What motivates you?

D*mn, I don’t like thinking about big questions sometimes. I talk a lot.

I’m motivated by seemingly being an underdog. Definitely feel like a lot of people in the city sleep on me. Is it not true? I’m saying in general, sometimes when I see certain things and I wont see my name there, I’m like “hm.”

I also just feel like I wasn’t always as proud of the music, now I’m a lot more confident. I believe in myself. That’s another one of my motivations. I’m motivated by me, not my ego, I’m motivated by my real self.

That reminds me of your song Vanity, I like the message of that song, can you talk about what feelings brought that song on? Did you always love yourself this much? Or is this something that you’ve more recently been like “Oh okay, I’m owning my sh*t”?

Good question. Vanity, is, well in all of my music I like irony, and I like satire and I like contradictions because it plays into irony.

I believe life is about duality and dichotomy. So when I think about saying something that leaves an impression on people, I think about kind of confusing them. So when I made Vanity I was like n*gga Im so happy that I’m all of these bad things- d*mn, that makes me extremely vain. It’s more like when you realize that you’re happy about doing things that don’t serve you, you kinda have to step back and think about “hm why am I happy about that?” I think that’s what BOMB is really about. Being back on your bullsh*t is about having to destroy pieces of yourself now so that you can actually be free and be who you really are.

How do you feel about the difference between lyrical rap and other kinds of rap that’s being put out? Do you think you’ll continue going this route?

I think it goes back to being an underdog. I’m doing a lot that people in Boston aren’t doing right now. The reason that Lyrical rap will always stand out is because that is the foundation of Hip-Hop and that’s the foundation of music in general, lyrics are profound. I remember when i was a kid I used to listen to Jill Scott interviews and she used to say “It doesn’t matter how you said it, it matters what you said. You could say it however you want, but if you didn’t say anything worth saying then- what are you saying?” You know that made so much sense to me. I like to carry that into my music.  

So if you had to pick a top 3 in the game today, who would you pick?

Kendrick Lamar. Hmm who’s as good as K.Dot? Honestly, y’all are going to hate me but… Drake. Drake is different. You know who I’m lowkey throwing in there? Saba. I’m like d*mn why am I throwing Saba up there? But Care For Me is like my favorite album that’s come out in the last 5 years.

What do you have planned for the future?

I got a project coming out in the colder months, it’s called Clairvoyance. I’m working on getting some women in Boston on that thang. I’m going to have my producer debut on that. I recently just started mixing and mastering. I’m going to start going in-cognegro as a producer. Get ready I’m about to run these placements up, look out.

So I’m working on that and I’m working on some visuals for B.O.M.B. I’m directing my videos these videos as well, y’all will be seeing a lot of my ideas come through. Probably by mid summer all of them will be out.


Connect with CHI on:

TWITTER

INSTAGRAM

SOUNDCLOUD

SPOTIFY

APPLE MUSIC

Gio Shyne – “Nonono” (Prod. Christian Yoon)

By: Shamus Hill

The intergalactic combination of Gio Shyne and Christian Yoon grasps airwaves once again — this time with an alluring single titled “Nonono”.

Towards the beginning of 2019, Gio made it known that he was going to be releasing a large quantity of music over the course of the year. He’s held true to this — dropping singles like “Gully”, “Bliss”, and more that have really strengthened the Dorchester native’s discography.

Christian Yoon has been responsible for the production featured on the majority of Gio Shyne’s releases, and following a listen through “Nonono” — you’ll understand exactly why this is so. Each instrumental he crafts unleashes a new side of Gio’s artistry that was previously untapped. Whether it’s fearless raps or downbeat melodies, each Gio Shyne track unpacks something new, so be on the lookout for what’s next to come.

Listen to “Nonono” below:

GIO SHYNE – “NONONO” SOUNDCLOUD LINK

Gio Shyne – Gully (Prod. hyperviolet)

By: Shamus Hill

Gio Shyne returns to the Graduation Music site today with perhaps his best piece of work yet — a fiery, well-crafted single titled “Gully”. The 2020 member is a on a mission to gift fans with new music every other week for the remainder of the year, and he’s certainly off to a phenomenal start with this release.

Gliding upon some hyperviolet production, Gio Shyne utilizes “Gully” to let his listeners know how he’s been feeling as of late. He’s on a mission towards the fulfillment of his goals, and is willing to jump over any obstacle he comes across during his journey to success. The development he’s showcased throughout his last several releases has been more than promising, with Gio Shyne quickly rising up the ranks of Massachusetts rappers. He’s going to be releasing a long list of tracks throughout this year, so be sure to tune in now before the takeover begins.

Listen to “Gully” below:

Mizzie CA$H – “D’usse Love” (Prod. JTK)

By: Shamus Hill

Gracing the Graduation Music site once again is Mizzie CA$H, who recently blessed listeners with his first release of the year. Getting into the mood for Valentine’s Day, Mizzie’s “D’usse Love” reveals a different side to the Boston rapper that fans hadn’t previously been exposed to.

This heartfelt release allows for Mizzie CA$H’s versatility to be brought to the forefront, alluding to how much developmental progress he’s been making overall as an artist. He’s spent the last few months prepping his debut project, Mizziechusetts, and if this release tells us anything, it’s that Mizzie is slated to have his most successful year yet.

Listen to “D’usse Love” below:

Gio Shyne – “Bliss” (Prod. Christian Yoon)

By: Shamus Hill

Fresh off of a highly energetic performance in Boston this past weekend, Gio Shyne and Christian Yoon bring their talents together to bless listeners with the official audio for “Bliss”.

We’ve said it dozens of times, but the music that these two make together is simply unparalleled. Gio’s voice is straight-up hypnotic, and he uses his music as a method for cleansing his mind. Offering an extremely true, yet vulnerable, side of himself, Gio Shyne utilizes “Bliss” to touch upon how he hasn’t been feeling love as of late. He’s started to become numb as a result, with his mind narrowing-in on the goals he’s laid out for himself. Caught between thinking too-much and not thinking enough, Gio’s arrived at a point where he’s ready to move forward regardless of what anyone else thinks or says.

Christian Yoon came through with superb production on “Bliss”, chopping-up a beat that literally makes you feel like you’re in the midst of a high-speed chase in space. He’s one of the most unique and hard-working producers in the state, with his level of talent only increasing with each release. Be on the lookout for 2020 this year, as the group is determined to become one of the more notable names in Boston.

Listen to “Bliss” below:

Pistola + Mike Hector – “Gang Shit”

By: Shamus Hill

Pistola and Mike Hector just dropped “Gang Shit”, and subsequently the duo have already set the bar high for Massachusetts artists in 2019. The last time they linked up the pair blessed listeners with “Fiji”, one of the best tracks to come out of Boston in 2018, and it’s safe to say that they’re 2 for 2 after listening to their latest release.

Both Pistola and Mike Hector haven’t wasted a moment with regard to building up their resumes over the course of these last few years, with each doing a tremendous job at shining a light onto the levels of talent that are coming out of the Bay State at the moment. Hector cooks up a flawless beat on “Gang Shit”, and is quickly followed-up with some addictive Pistola flows. Anyone that’s listened to the Dorchester-native’s music will find themselves playing this track over-and-over again. We can only be hopeful that Mike Hector and Pistola will continue to work together in the future, as it’s become overwhelmingly apparent that these two have a unique chemistry between each other.

Listen to “Gang Shit” below:

Artist: Pistola

Production: Mike Hector

Gio $hyne – “Buzzin” (Prod. christian yoon)

By: Shamus Hill 

WHY MY LINE KEEP BUZZIN???

Ladies and Gentlemen, 2020’s Gio $hyne and Christian Yoon recently joined forces to drop off one of this year’s best tracks, “Buzzin”. Anyone who’s been around me throughout the last couple of weeks has most definitely heard this record and understands how truly addictive the hook on this track is to listen to. Debuting via Soundcloud just days before last month’s 2020 Night, “Buzzin” serves as Gio $hyne’s moment to release some of the energy that he’s been building up.

I’ve said it an absurd amount of times, but Christian Yoon’s production talent is at a very high level. The 2020-affiliated producer has combined with Gio $hyne in the past to concoct some quality records, but “Buzzin” may honestly be my favorite release from this duo. Gio has the awesome ability to flow buoyantly, yet purposefully on his songs, and he really showcases that talent on this offering. Combine that with the stellar talent of Christian Yoon, and you’ve got a well-put-together track that’ll have fans from Boston and beyond rallying around the 2020 name.

Witnessing the performance of this track at 2020 Night was nothing short of thrilling. Despite it only being a handful of days after the release of “Buzzin”, nothing was able to stop Gio $hyne fans from learning every single word to the record. The energy you can feel purely through listening to the Dorchester-native’s tracks is part of the reason I fell in love with the young artist’s music. Having the privilege of witnessing the effect of this sonic-energy on other fans of the music was stunning.

2020 is one of the Boston music scene’s most gifted collectives, with each member grinding their ass off to make a name for themselves. Gio $hyne and Christian Yoon are only two of the puzzle pieces that help make this group of young talents so great, and I’m excited to watch how they make an even greater impact in music throughout their future.

In the mean time, listen to Gio $hyne’s “Buzzin” below:

A Reflection On Cousin Stizz’s ‘Suffolk County’ 3-Year Anniversary Show

By: Seamus Fay

Within the geographically-minded landscape of rap music, the weight behind a homecoming show consists of one central theme: loyalty. This encapsulates loyalty from the crowd, loyalty from the artist, and loyalty to a vision of success and “making it out” of one’s hometown which, amidst other manifestations of hard work, also translates into the ever-important power of pride. On June 6th, just last Sunday, Cousin Stizz crafted his own definition of both loyalty and pride by offering a live performance at the Paradise Rock Club in celebration of the anniversary of his critically-acclaimed debut mixtape, Suffolk County. The show sold out in 6 minutes.

At face value, the function of this performance was to make sure that those who missed Boston Calling would still receive the opportunity to see Stizz live while he was in the city. But looking back on the energy brought into the venue that night, the true function of the show was a reflection on the success that Stizz has seen since 2015 when he first released Suffolk County. The whole city came out, and just like that, the Dorchester native used this family affair to look back on the roots that brought him where he is today.

Personally, the reason that this project has remained a timeless collection of music in my ears is mostly due to the way that it brings Stizz’s lifestyle down to a listener-friendly level, complete with a certain degree of familiarity that only helps Boston fans to embrace its magic even more directly. Whether it be the triumphant, anthemic nature of “Dum Dope”, the unapologetically confident hooks of “Fresh Prince”, or the unfaltering honesty that comes through on “No Explanation”, Stizz tells it how it is on this project, and in doing so, listeners are doused in the emotional roller coaster of life in Fields Corner.

With this, Suffolk County is, in a nutshell, a uniquely comprehensive look of the triumphs and struggles that predated Stizz’s rap success. Life was certainly more simple, but times weren’t easy by any means, and the way that such intense pain and passion are communicated through ringing hooks that still resonate with people today, defines what it means to be a classic piece of music. And now, my Suffolk County importance rant is done, and we can delve into the show.


The first point of importance that surrounds such a legendary night was seen in Big Leano’s spot opening for Stizz. Any fan of Boston music might tell you that Stizz and Leano are close friends, but this brotherhood runs far deeper below the surface than that. In fact, Big Leano’s debut performance within the city’s rap community, after releasing just one song prior to the show (the ever-important “Muddy Sip”), was at Cousin Stizz’s first-ever headlining show in Boston at the Middle East. These two have been working towards the top since before rap was the plan, and to see them together even today, more strengthened in their bond than ever, is an immaculate sight.

From the mud all the way to fame, loyalty doesn’t budge.

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That being said, Leano’s undying energy and galvanizing set, which, of course, included the insanity of a “Lean For Sale” mosh pit, made way for a perfect transition into an unforgettable performance from Stizz. But before the headlining act graced the stage, he retreated into the dressing room of the Paradise Rock Club, where a number of close friends and acquaintances hung around in pure excitement for what was to come. Luckily enough, I was brought into the room by a friend of Stizz’s (shouts out to Juxi one time), and what I noticed most specifically was the way that the Fields Corner native gets into the zone before shows.

Just a few minutes prior to when the opening notes of “Ain’t Really Much” would play and Stizz would jump on stage, he wasn’t talking to anyone, messing around, or even communicating with the world in front of him. Instead, he slipped his headphones on, stared at the ground, and simply slipped into an isolated zone, marking the calm before the storm that was a sold-out, nearly 1,000-person performance in his hometown.

And then magic happened.

Stizz went through Suffolk County‘s dense tracklist of hits, one by one, garnering the attention and love of the crowd with every successive note of music. The show didn’t need anything extra to make it an incredible performance, but sure enough, when Jefe Replay gets involved, there’s no limit on what insanity might occur. He’s an undeniable rockstar, and rockstars do rockstar things. Like crowd-walking. Not crowd-diving, for those who may be confused. Crowd-walking.

The chilling melodies of “Talk” creeped into the venue’s sound systems, and after Stizz had unleashed his unforgettable verses, Replay took center stage for his monumental role in the song. But just when it looked as if he might dive into the crowd to deliver each line, he positioned his feet on the raised hands and starting to walk out into a sea of feverish fans. Showmanship aside, the fact that the crowd walk even happened was insane in and of itself, and I suppose it only adds to the long list of reasons why Jefe Replay is a star and why this show superseded the concept of what a rap show usually is.

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My final point of importance, before this article takes the form of a novel, was seen in the simple barrage of “thank you’s” that Stizz proclaimed throughout the night. He paused his set at least 4 or 5 times after a variety of different songs, and looking out at the physical evidence of how far he has come as an artist, Stizz couldn’t help but show his appreciation for his supporters. And sure, obviously most performers would be saying thank you if they, too, sold out a show in six minutes, but coming from Stizz, with his home city leaning on every new syllable that came out of his mouth, this “thank you” went far below the surface.

The Suffolk County anniversary show was a step back in time to one of Boston’s most iconic mixtapes and the lifestyle that came with it. Time moves quite rapidly with no foreseeable slowing, but by revisiting this classic set of anthems with the same fans who have watched Stizz undergo both musical and personal growth since it’s 2015 release, life slowed down for a moment and all felt right. Stizz is one of Boston’s bonafide stars, and we couldn’t ask for any better artist to help play the role.

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Before I wrap this article up, however, it’s also important to note that the real magic of this night is only achieved when we take a step back and marvel at the inspirational sight of comradery as a city that it brought together. For the few, impactful hours that the show spanned, Suffolk County was suspended in its status as an eminent assemblage of reflective sound and thought, surrounded by an ethereal glow that reminds us, above all things, of one mixtape that united people from all different backgrounds and helped to offer us a common thread of pride in our city’s music scene that before then, had not been achieved in such an authentic, modern light.

Just one night of unwavering authenticity and prideful proclamations towards Boston granted me with an abundance of memories that I’ll carry with me for the rest of my life, and for that, only two words capture the moment: thank you.

Thank you to Cousin Stizz, thank you to Tim Larew, thank you to Boston, and thank you to every person that made such a magnificent night possible. Suffolk County remains one of the best bodies of music that I have heard to date, and it set the stage for a bright future that even Stizz didn’t think was possible.

I guess there’s a reason he’s our favorite cousin.


Thank you to @gregisonfire for the photos used in this article.

Sir South ft. Big Leano – “Anyways” (Prod. StoopKid)

By: Shamus Hill 

Featured in the second episode of GRADUATION MUSIC RADIO, Sir South and Big Leano recently collaborated on South’s first single of 2018, “Anyways” – an ode to how little mind the duo pays towards certain women in their lives. Instinctually, I was drawn in by the Big Leano feature, but what has kept me listening to the track over and over again has been South’s exceptional work on each of his verses. The combination of Leano’s intoxicating hook and South’s lyricism make this another track that the city should be proud of, and being my first taste of Sir South’s music, I was pleasantly surprised to find yet another young talent from the Boston area to get behind.

In addition to the work put in by South and Leano, local producer Stoop Kid has once again delivered an incredible job on the boards with this one. Everywhere I look, Stoop Kid’s name has been popping up as of late, producing a few of my favorite tracks to come out of Boston in recent memory. With this, considering the track that he’s on, Stoop’s catalog is growing with new gems by the day, and we’re here for it. That being said, Listen to Sir South ft. Big Leano “Anyways” below: