Jack Karowak Reflects on His Recent Album – ‘The Myth of The Mechanical Universe’

By: Shamus Hill

Wherever you find yourself in this current moment — close your eyes and take some deep breaths. Think about the moments in your life that have brought you tremendous amounts of joy and tranquility. Search for that peace that lies within you. Can you feel it yet? That overwhelming sensation of joy that seemingly seizes control of whatever negative emotion that surrounds you? It’s beautiful isn’t it? Let all of your problems and worries melt away. Even if you only close your eyes for five seconds, you’ll notice a tremendous amount of change in how you’re feeling.

This change in thought is what drives Plymouth’s Jack Karowak to make music. No matter who you are, or what you’re going through — we all need a break from the daily challenges that we endure throughout the course of our lives. The Myth of the Mechanical Universe serves as a sonic embodiment of this. Sitting at 9 songs and approximately 27 minutes in length, Jack Karowak’s latest release seeks to provide the listener with the motivation to be in full-control of their lives, and subsequently their destiny. Though this is only the second body of work to be released by Jack up through this point in time, it packs the depth of someone who’s had an incredibly long tenure in music.

I took some time to speak with the Plymouth native about what motivated The Myth of the Mechanical Universe, how Ricky Felix and Brad Feeney played a role in the project’s inception, and his path towards showcasing a free-range of emotion in his discography.


When starting your journey towards the creation of ‘The Myth of the Mechanical Universe’, what were some of your early goals with respect to how you envisioned this album?

Jack: Sonically, I wanted it to embody all the elements of music that I love the most. I wanted it to sound refreshing to the listener and provide an experience you wouldn’t really find on any other album. Another goal of mine was to show a side of me that wasn’t fully expressed in my first project. I wanted this one to really show the range in my music

What were some of your sources of inspiration when making this project?

Jack: I was listening to a lot of philosophical/spiritual lectures from Alan Watts, Ram Dass, Terrence McKenna, and Hunter Thompson. Musically, I was inspired by people like Lauryn Hill, Earl, John Mayer, and a lot of old blues and soul music. I also drew a lot of inspiration from horror movies, specifically A24.

There’s a long list of names attached with the creation of this album, however both Ricky Felix and Brad Feeney were staples throughout the entire project’s tracklist. How did they assist you in molding the sonic structure of ‘The Myth of the Mechanical Universe’?

Jack: This project wouldn’t exist without Ricky and Brad. I linked up with Ricky for the first time about a year ago, and right when he started playing me shit I knew our sounds would mix perfectly. Ricky is a great producer because he started off the session by asking questions, trying to get a clear picture of the idea in my head. He wanted to help me make my project, not *just* a project. Brad has been the homie, and my engineer, for about 4 years now. I recorded the both of my projects with him, slowly but surely finding my sound and figuring out how to execute ideas in the studio. I got nothing but love for that man, he’s been putting up with me calling his phone, waking him up for 9AM sessions every other day for the past 2.5 years hahaha

What’s music-making process typically like? Do you prefer any specific settings when writing?

Jack: Yeah I definitely like to be alone when I’m writing, I feel like the more people there are, the further my attention gets spread and pulled around. When I’m alone I can really settle into an idea and move freely inside that train of thought.

If you had to single out one song from this album as being your favorite, or the one that you want fans to listen to the most, which would you pick?

Jack: I’d have to say Playing in traffic. That song felt like it made itself. Writing it was very therapeutic and I had never articulated my feelings in lyrics so easily. It almost felt like I was singing along to it as I was writing it. Not to mention pfey laid down an incredible bass line on that track 

Has it always been easy for you to pour your real life emotions and experiences into your music? 

Jack: I think so because emotion has always been the thing that drew me to music. Regaurdless of the story I always looked for and admired authenticity in artists. Emotion is the thing that connects the artist and the listener and if your trying to cover up certain regions of your emotion then you cheat everyone involved 

How would you say being from Plymouth, and Massachusetts in general, has effected you as a person, and subsequently the music you create? 

Jack: I think it’s inspired me to just create the shit I’m into. Growing up in MA there wasn’t a huge music scene to look up to, so I pulled my inspirations from all over the place, their only consistency being that they resonated with me. Now the city is starting to get a little bigger on the map and it’s beautiful. There’s a big collaborative mentality, and one person’s success is celebrated by all. I think the main effect it had on me was teaching me to trust my ear.

What do you want your listeners to get from your musical catalog? What message do you want to relay on ‘The Myth of the Mechanical Universe’? 

Jack: I hope the listeners get whatever they need, whether it’s just a three minute escape from their own head, or they end up walking away with new ideas about life. Listening to Ram Dass, I noticed that another person introducing new ways of thought provides you with the freedom to identify with it, and see yourself from a whole new perspective. The message behind TMOTMU, to put it simply, is don’t be Mechanical. Mechanical means you ain’t thinking about what your doing, you’re just bouncing around imaginary social structures and reacting to life as opposed to responding to it. You ain’t in the moment and using your full awareness. The Myth is that nature is the same way but that couldn’t be further from the truth.

What’s next for you?

Videos and merch otw ✌🏽


Listen to The Myth of The Mechanical Universe below:

CLICK HERE TO STREAM ‘THE MYTH OF THE MECHANICAL UNIVERSE’

Jack Karowak – “Medicine” [Music Video]

By: Shamus Hill

Treehouse Audio was one of the most potent releases to come out of Massachusetts in several years, with Jack Karowak and company working tirelessly in order to push out the well-hammered album. “Medicine” ended up being one of the first tracks off of the project to really resonate with me, so I was thrilled to find out that it was next in-line for a visual treatment. Recruiting Xandros to help bring his vision to life, the pair hit it out-of-the-park with this one.

The meaning of “Medicine” lies within the realization that we all need to settle down a bit in order to set our minds straight. Jack paints scenes of rushing towards our goals to the point where we lose sight of what we’ve been working towards to begin with. Once we sit-back and take a moment to maintain our perception of things, we can then move correctly. A beautiful song that’s accompanied by an equally beautiful video, “Medicine” is certainly a highlight within Jack Karowak’s discography.

Watch the official video for “Medicine” below:

Artist: Jack Karowak

Production: David Walker & Triple Beam Brad

Director: Xandros

Pistola – “Fiji” [Prod. Mike Hector]

By: Seamus Fay

Throughout the past few weeks, Pistola has been making his city proud (as always) with the widespread success of his single, “P.I.S.T.O.L.A.”, premiered via ELEVATOR. Now with over 500k views and an incredible amount of love being shown to the young artist’s nonchalant yet hard-hitting style, Stola is back yet again with another hit to prepare us for his forthcoming debut project. Today, he hits Graduation Music with the Mike Hector produced banger, “Fiji”, and it may just be one of my personal favorite tracks of his to date.

For starters, we should make it clear that Mike Hector was the perfect producer to hop on the boards for this one. Previously residing in Boston but now based in LA, Hector has rapidly built up his beat portfolio with credits on a number of well-known songs, the most notable being Kendrick Lamar’s “GOD” off of DAMN. Taking this unmatched style and creating an airy, melodic atmosphere for Stola to float through, “Fiji” watches the acclaimed producer declare his versatility in an incredibly impressive way.

This track is a perfect example of the potential that Pistola has, and with the hot streak that he has been on throughout the past few months, I feel confident in saying that the Boston native’s debut project is about to be something truly special. His seamless style fits with perfect precision over the sound of this single, making for an anthem to keep on repeat as we watch Pistola continue to rise to the top. “Fiji” is yet another hint of the heat on the way, so be sure to give it a listen below and show some love to what could be the next star out of Boston. All in all, Pistola’s got one.

Jack Karowak – “Form” [Prod. David Walker]

By: Seamus Fay

In my time covering Massachusetts’ budding music scene, I have stumbled across the name Jack Karowak a few times, but admittedly, I never really took the time to go through everything he has put out as of yet. However, with the release of his latest single, “Form”, I truly recognize what I was sleeping on. Not only is this young artist an absolute force vocally, but his stellar choice of production complements his natural talent wonderfully, subsequently making for some standout singles that I am just now getting hip to.

Produced by none other than David Walker, Karowak’s latest takes fans deep into his world with an introspective instrumental and reflective verses, offering his ambitions and his life with a genuine touch of personality. Acting as the cherry on top, the guitar and bass, courtesy of Brad Feeney and Pat Fey (respectively), bring this one to the next level, molding everything together and meshing with Karowak’s vocals seamlessly. Having said that, don’t make the mistake that I made – check out “Form” below and get hip to Jack Karowak as soon as possible – he’s onto something special.